Tepecano language

Tepecano

Region
Mexico: Jalisco

Extinct
1980–2000

Language family

Uto-aztecan

Piman (Tepiman)

Tepecano

Language codes

ISO 639-3
tep

Glottolog
tepe1278[1]

The Tepecano language is an extinct indigenous language of Mexico belonging to the Uto-Aztecan language-family. It was formerly spoken by a small group of people in Azqueltán (earlier Atzqueltlán), Jalisco, a small village on the Río Bolaños in the far northern part of the state, just east of the territory of the Huichol people. Most closely related to Southern Tepehuán of the state of Durango, Tepecano was a Mesoamerican language and evinced many of the traits that define the Mesoamerican Linguistic Area. So far as is known, the last speaker of Tepecano was Lino de la Rosa (born September 22, 1895), who was still living as of February 1980.[2]

Map of Tepecano and neighboring Chichimeca nations during the 16th century

Research on Tepecano was first carried out by the American linguistic anthropologist John Alden Mason in Azqueltán during the period 1911-13. This work led to the publication of a monographic grammatical sketch (1916) as well as an article on native prayers in Tepecano that Mason had collected from informants (1918). Later field-research was conducted by American linguist Dennis Holt in 1965 and 1979–80, but none of his results have so far been published.[3]
Morphology[edit]
Tepecano is an agglutinative language, where words use suffix complexes for a variety of purposes with several morphemes strung together.
Notes[edit]

Indigenous peoples of North America portal

^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). “Tepecano”. Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
^ Holt 2001: 30
^ Dennis Holt, personal communication

Bibliography[edit]

Campbell, Lyle (1997). American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America. Oxford Studies in Anthropological Linguistics, no. 4. William Bright (series general ed.) (OUP paperback [2000] ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-509427-1. OCLC 32923907. 
Holt, Dennis (Spring 2001). “Valedictory: Lino de la Rosa” (PDF online facsimile). Ogmios Newsletter. Bath, England: Foundation for Endangered Languages. 2.4 (16): 30. ISSN 1471-0382. OCLC 223025309. 
Mason, J. Alden (June 1916). “Tepecano, a Piman Language of Western Mexico” (digitized reproduction online at Int
일산오피

Activity book

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An activity book is a type of book, generally aimed at children, which contains interactive content such as games, puzzles, quizzes, pictures to colour and other elements which involve writing or drawing in the book itself. The book may, or may not, have a loose narrative or contain other non-interactive elements structured around the interactive elements. Activity books may be made for entertainment, education or a mixture of both.
Specific types of activity book include colouring books and puzzle books. A book is normally referred to as an activity book if it combines a variety of interactive elements and does not fall neatly into one of these more specific categories.

Contents

1 Examples

1.1 Diary of a Wimpy Kid
1.2 Horrible Histories
1.3 Where’s Wally?

2 References

Examples[edit]
Diary of a Wimpy Kid[edit]
The Diary of a Wimpy Kid Do-It-Yourself Book by Jeff Kinney is an activity book which contains space for readers to keep a written or drawn diary, or journal, as well Wimpy Kid-themed puzzles and cartoons. and it contains many jokes about the life of the cartoon Greg Heffley
Horrible Histories[edit]
The Horrible Histories series by Terry Deary, and its spin-offs, include a number of educational activity books.[1]
Where’s Wally?[edit]
The Where’s Wally? series of books (known as Where’s Waldo? in the USA) by Martin Handford consists of both puzzle books, wherein the reader must search for characters hidden in pictures, and activity books such as Where’s Waldo?: The Ultimate Fun Book, which include a wider range of games and activities as well as puzzles.
References[edit]

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

^ Scholastic Children’s Books: Horrible Histories

This article about a book is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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BJ모음

Yadana (film)

Yadana

Directed by
Ei Ei Khaing

Written by
Ei Ei Khaing

Starring
Kyaw Thu
Po Thaukkya
Tun Eindra Bo
Thet Mon Myint

Country
Myanmar

Language
Burmese

Yadana (Burmese: ရတနာ, pronounced: [jədənà]; lit. Jewels) is a 2006 Burmese film directed by Ei Ei Khaing.[1][2]
Cast[edit]

Kyaw Thu
Po Thaukkya
Tun Eindra Bo
Thet Mon Myint
Wyne Su Khaing Thein

Production[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (July 2010)

References[edit]

^ “New film features Myanmar and its traditional customs”. The Myanmar Times Volume 14 , No.265. May 9–15, 2005. Retrieved 2007-11-17. 
^ “Film screened for underprivileged audience”. The Myanmar Times Volume 16, No.307. March 6–12, 2006. Retrieved 2007-11-17. 

This article related to film in Myanmar is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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분당오피

1923 Kansas State Wildcats football team

1923 Kansas State Wildcats football

Conference
Missouri Valley Conference

1923 record
4–2–2 (2–2–2 MVIAA)

Head coach
Charlie Bachman

Offensive scheme
Notre Dame Box

Home stadium
Memorial Stadium

Seasons

← 1922
1924 →

1923 Missouri Valley football standings

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Conf
 
 
Overall

Team
W
 
L
 
T
 
 
W
 
L
 
T

Nebraska $
3

0

2
 
 
4

2

2

Kansas
3

0

3
 
 
5

0

3

Drake
3

1

0
 
 
5

2

0

Iowa State
3

2

1
 
 
4

3

1

Kansas State
2

2

2
 
 
4

2

2

Missouri
1

3

2
 
 
2

3

3

Oklahoma
2

4

0
 
 
3

5

0

Grinnell
1

3

0
 
 
2

6

0

Washington (MO)
1

4

0
 
 
3

5

0

$ – Conference champion

The 1923 Kansas State Agricultural College Wildcats football team represented Kansas State Agricultural College in the 1923 college football season.[1]
References[edit]

^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/schools/kansas-state/1923-schedule.html

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Kansas State Wildcats football

Venues

Ahearn Field (1911–1921)
Memorial Stadium (1922–1967)
Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium (1968–present)

Bowls & rivalries

Bowl games
Iowa State
Kansas: Sunflower Showdown (Governor’s Cup)

Culture & lore

Willie the Wildcat
“Wildcat Victory”
“Wabash Cannonball”
Marching band
Timeline of football in Kansas
Aggieville riots
1939 Nebraska game

People

Head coaches
NFL draftees
Statistical leaders

Seasons

1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017

분당오피

Katrina Cameron

Katrina Cameron

— Gymnast ♀ —

Country represented
 Canada

Born
(1995-05-09) 9 May 1995 (age 21)
Mississauga, Ontario

Height
5 ft 5 in (165 cm)

Discipline
Rhythmic gymnastics

Level
Senior International Elite

Years on national team
2007–2016

Retired
2016

Medal record

Representing  Canada

Rhythmic gymnastics

Pan American Games

2011 Guadalajara
Group all-around

2011 Guadalajara
3 ribbons + 2 hoops

2011 Guadalajara
5 balls

2015 Toronto
5 ribbons

2015 Toronto
6 clubs + 2 hoops

Pan American Championships

2014 Mississauga
10 clubs

2014 Mississauga
3 balls + 2 ribbons

Youth Olympic Games

2010 Singapore
Group all-around

Katrina Cameron (born 9 May 1995) is a Canadian group rhythmic gymnast. She represents her nation at international competitions.
She participated at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.[1] She also competed at world championships, including at the 2011, 2014 and 2015 World Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships.[2]
References[edit]

^ “Katrina Cameron”. Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 
^ “2011 World Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships athletes – Katrina Cameron”. Longinestiming.com. Retrieved 27 January 2016. 

External links[edit]

Katrina Cameron
http://www.bbc.com/sport/olympics/2012/athletes/5ec33954-8fff-4733-99f2-773ba1d8752c
http://www.mississauga.com/sports-story/6762850-rhythmic-gymnast-katrina-cameron-calls-it-a-career/
https://www.gymbc.org/news/post/canadas-artistic-and-rhythmic-teams-announced-for-pan-am-games

Category:1995 births Category:Living people Category:Canadian rhythmic gymnasts Category:Place of birth missing (living people) Category:Gymnasts at the 2012 Summer Olympics Category:Olympic gymnasts of Canada Category:Gymnasts at the 2015 Pan American Games Category:Gymnasts at the 2011 Pan American Games Category:Gymnasts at the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics Category:Pan American Games medalists in gymnastics Category:Pan American Games silver medalists for Canada Category:Pan American Games bronze medalists for Canada

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Praga NDO

Praga NDO

Praga NDO, model 1947

Overview

Manufacturer
Praga, Karosa

Production
70

Model years
1938-1948

Body and chassis

Body style
bus

Powertrain

Engine
80.9–91.9 kW (108.5–123.2 hp) gasoline engines

Transmission
5-speed

Dimensions

Length
9.86–10.6 m (388–417 in)

Width
2.3–2.5 m (91–98 in)

Height
2.8–2.95 m (110–116 in)

Curb weight
7,690–8,070 kg (16,954–17,791 lb)[1]

Chronology

Predecessor
Praga ND truck

Successor
Škoda 706 RTO

Contents

1 Development
2 Construction
3 Usage
4 References

Development[edit]
The Praga NDO bus chassis was developed in late 1930s in Czechoslovakia. First buses manufactured by Praga in Brno were used since 1938, but the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in March 1939 has forced a stop in the production. Simultaneous Switch to right-hand traffic in Czechoslovakia has also forced the re-work of all existing buses. The production was resumed by Karosa in 1947, with first bus appearing on route in Bratislava 3 December 1947. Other bus manufacturers in Czechoslovakia were shut down in 1948. By that time, the NDO bus chassis was thoroughly obsolete, but production of NDO bus has continued anyway due to urgent demand for mass transportation in rebuilt Czech cities. After building 50 buses in 1947-1948, the NDO bus was replaced on production lines with the Škoda 706 RO bus, which was superseded in time by Škoda 706 RTO bus.
Construction[edit]
The construction of the NDO bus was based on the Praga ND truck, with the forward-located engine and its cowling unchanged. The bus body was mostly made of metal, only the roof was made of wood and canvas. The bus maximal speed was 55 km/h (34 mph). The maximal loaded weight of the bus was 13,600 kg (30,000 lb).
The long-haul layout featured a four seats per row, with central aisle and forward door. Driver had a separate door to the driving compartment. The capacity of long-haul NDO buses was 42 passengers. The short-haul layout featured wider aisle with seats arranged along the bus walls facing aisle. The folding door was located in the center of the bus body. The short-haul layout had the 65 passengers capacity, with 27 seats. Also, a short-hail version with the two doors was made. The front door was still operated from the driver`s compartment, while the rear door was operated by the conductor.
Usage[edit]
At least 50 NDO buses were used

KJNB-LD

KJNB-LD

Jonesboro, Arkansas
United States

Branding
Fox 39 (on LD1)
CBS 39 (on LD2)

Channels
Digital: 39 (UHF)
Virtual: 39 (PSIP)

Subchannels
39.1 Fox
39.2 CBS

Affiliations
Fox

Owner
Waypoint Media
(Jonesboro TV, LLC)

Founded
November 22, 2011 (2011-11-22)

First air date
June 1, 2015; 20 months ago (2015-06-01)

Call letters’ meaning
JoNesBoro

Sister station(s)
KJNE-LD (translator)

Former callsigns
K39LS-D (2011–2014)

Former affiliations
Dark (2011–2015)

Transmitter power
15 kW

Height
106 m

Class
LD

Facility ID
187271

Transmitter coordinates
36°03′30.0″N 90°56′36.0″W / 36.058333°N 90.943333°W / 36.058333; -90.943333

Licensing authority
FCC

Public license information:
Profile
CDBS

Website
www.kjnbtv.com

KJNB-LD, virtual and UHF digital channel 39, is a low-powered primary Fox affiliate located in Jonesboro, Arkansas, United States. The station is owned by Waypoint Media, LLC. KJNB maintains a small office in the Regions Bank Building in Jonesboro, and its transmitter is located on Highway 91/Southern Avenue in unincorporated Lawrence County, southeast of Walnut Ridge.

Contents

1 History
2 Digital television

2.1 Digital channels

3 Programming

3.1 Main channel
3.2 Secondary channel

4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
The station first signed on the air on June 1, 2015 as the market’s second commercial television station, after ABC/NBC affiliate KAIT (channel 8), which signed on the air in July 1963 as an independent station. Until this point, Fox programming was available in northeast Arkansas over-the-air and on cable through WHBQ-TV (channel 13) in Memphis, Tennessee (prior to former owner Fox Television Stations’ purchase and subsequent affiliation switch of WHBQ in 1995, area cable systems previously piped in that station’s predecessor affiliates: WMKW-TV (channel 30, now CW affiliate WLMT) from 1987 to 1990, and WPTY-TV (channel 24, now ABC affiliate WATN-TV) from 1990 until it lost the Fox affiliation to WHBQ).[1] Despite being licensed as a low-powered television station, Waypoint Media secured the affiliation agreement with Fox by promising to provide coverage of at least 93% of the market through its over-the-air signal and through distribution on local cable and satellite providers.[1]
On August 1, 2015, KJNB-LD signed on a second digital subchannel, carrying programming from CBS (as the Jonesboro area’s first locally based CBS affili

Nunge

Nunge is the name of a beach strip 2 kilometres north of the East African town Bagamoyo in Tanzania. Nunge’s southernmost point is the village Mlingotini.
The Swahili word “nungu” means “globefish” in English, “nunge” means “leper colony”.
For centuries the Nunge coast has been a place where salt was extracted from the seawater and traded to African inland areas. It is characterized by coastal mangroves and forests of coconut palms.
In recent years, a couple of seaside resort hotels have been constructed along the Nunge beach.
External links[edit]

Bagamoyo and Nunge photos

Coordinates: 06°24′33″S 38°53′51″E / 6.40917°S 38.89750°E / -6.40917; 38.89750 (Nunge)

This Tanzania location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Swalmen railway station

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Swalmen

Swalmen railway station

Location
Swalmen,  Netherlands

Coordinates
51°14′09″N 6°01′57″E / 51.23583°N 6.03250°E / 51.23583; 6.03250Coordinates: 51°14′09″N 6°01′57″E / 51.23583°N 6.03250°E / 51.23583; 6.03250

Owned by
Nederlandse Spoorwegen

Line(s)
Maastricht–Venlo railway

Platforms
2

Tracks
2

History

Opened
1862

Electrified
No

Services

Preceding station
 
Arriva
 
Following station

Reuver
toward Nijmegen

Veolia Stoptrein 32200

Roermond
Terminus

Location

Swalmen is a railway station in Swalmen, Netherlands. The station was opened in 1862 and is located on the Maastricht–Venlo railway, which is also known as the Staatslijn E. The train services are operated by Arriva.
Train services[edit]
The station is served by the following service(s):

2x per hour local services (Stoptrein) Nijmegen – Venlo – Roermond

Bus service[edit]

66: Venlo – Tegelen – Bellfeld – Reuver – Swalmen – Roermond

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Station Swalmen.

NS website (Dutch)
Dutch Public Transport journey planner (Dutch)

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Railway stations in Limburg (Netherlands)

Beek-Elsloo
Blerick
Bunde
Chevremont
Echt
Eygelshoven
Markt
Geleen-Lutterade
Geleen Oost
Heerlen
De Kissel
Woonboulevard
Hoensbroek
Horst-Sevenum
Houthem-Sint Gerlach
Kerkrade Centrum
Klimmen-Ransdaal
Landgraaf
Maastricht
Noord
Randwyck
Meerssen
Mook-Molenhoek
Nuth
Reuver
Roermond
Schin op Geul
Schinnen
Sittard
Spaubeek
Susteren
Swalmen
Tegelen
Valkenburg
Venlo
Venray
Voerendaal
Weert

GWR 0-4-0ST

GWR No. 1340 Trojan preserved at Didcot Railway Centre

The GWR 0-4-0ST steam locomotives were acquired by the Great Western Railway at the 1923 grouping. They came from small railways (mostly in South Wales) and from contractors. Some of them survived into British Railways ownership in 1948 and a few are preserved.

Contents

1 Details
2 In fiction
3 Gallery
4 See also
5 Sources
6 References
7 External links

Details[edit]

This transport-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

Railway
Name/Number
Builder
Works no.
Build date
GWR no.
BR no.
Notes

Ystalyfera Tin Works
Hercules
Peckett
810
1900

1
Taken into stock in 1948

Swansea Harbour Trust
3
Hudswell Clarke

1905
150

Swansea Harbour Trust
5
Andrew Barclay
1045
1905
701
1140
Withdrawn 1958[1]

Swansea Harbour Trust
7
Peckett

1899–1904
886

Swansea Harbour Trust
8
Peckett

1899–1904
926

Swansea Harbour Trust
9
Peckett

1899–1904
930

Swansea Harbour Trust
10
Peckett
974
1904
933

Sold to National Coal Board in 1928

Swansea Harbour Trust
11
Peckett

1906
929
1141

Swansea Harbour Trust
12
Peckett
1105
1908
968
1143
Withdrawn 1960[2]

Swansea Harbour Trust
13
Hawthorn Leslie
2781
1909
974
1144
Withdrawn 1960[3]

Swansea Harbour Trust
14
Hudswell Clarke
939
1911
943
1142
Withdrawn 1959[4]

Swansea Harbour Trust
15
Peckett
1282
1912
1085
1146
Withdrawn 1951[5]

Swansea Harbour Trust
16
Peckett
1302
1913
1086
1147
Withdrawn 1951[6]

Swansea Harbour Trust
18
Peckett
1522
1918
1098
1145
Withdrawn 1959[7]

Powlesland and Mason
3
Peckett
1328
1907
696
1150
Withdrawn 1952[8]

Powlesland and Mason
4
Peckett
1449
1913
779
1151
Sold 1964

Powlesland and Mason
5
Brush Electrical
301
1903
795

Rebuilt with pannier tanks in 1926

Powlesland and Mason
6
Brush Electrical
314
1906
921

Sold to Berry Wiggins & Co. Ltd. in 1928. On display at the Snibston Discovery Museum until March 2016.

Powlesland and Mason
7
Avonside

1874
925

Ex GWR 1330; formerly South Devon Railway Rook. Purchased in 1906

Powlesland and Mason
11
Peckett

1907
927

Powlesland and Mason
12
Peckett

1907
935
1152
Withdrawn 1961[9]

Powlesland and Mason
14
Andrew Barclay
1273
1912
928

Powlesland and Mason
Dorothy
Hawthorn Leslie
2558
1903
942
1153
Withdrawn 1955[10]

Cardiff Railway
5
Kitson & Co.
3799
1898
1338
1338
Preserved at Didcot

Alexandra Docks
Trojan
Avonside
1386
1897
1340

Preserved at Didcot

Alexandra Docks
Alexandr